Bosque

A flock of snow geese fly in to the Bosque del Apache Wildlife Refuge.

A flock of snow geese fly in to the Bosque del Apache Wildlife Refuge.

My Mom and I went out for a mini vacation yesterday. The Bosque del Apache refuge is about a three hour drive from where I live.

Driving through miles of gravelly desert covered in scrub brush seemed to have a cleansing effect on my spirit. I watched seemingly endless miles of flat land roll by, accented by distant mountains and volcanic crags, underneath a flawless blue sky. Sometimes when I travel, I try to say hello to the local spirits in passing, but this time, everything was pretty quiet.

I turned inward to check on the Heru-aspect that goes with me everywhere. (I think I will call him Shadow-Heru for convenience. He appears to be a shadow aspect of Heru-sa-Aset. If he doesn’t act like the Heru you know, that’s why.) It felt like he had been lulled into a restful sleep. I counted that as a good thing because he has literally been a pain in the aura for the past few weeks. It’s good that he was able to relax for a change.

A Red Tail Hawk watches us from a tree at the bosque.

A Red Tail Hawk watches us from a tree at the bosque.

Going on a Sunday might not have been the best idea because a lot of the small town restaurants were closed. We did manage to find a nice small Mexican restaurant at TorC. The waitress asked the traditional New Mexican question, red or green? Then she asked another question that I’d never heard asked before, mild, medium, or hot? I asked for green and medium. By the time I got done with my enchilada, tamale, and chile relleno, my lips were burning. I’m glad I didn’t say “hot.” It didn’t seem to slow me down much though. That kind of food is especially satisfying because the chilis are grown locally, most likely somewhere along the Rio Grande valley, fed by the same river that flows past my city. I finished it up with an order of sopapillas. Fried bread (tortilla) dripping with honey, a desert fit for a Kemetic!

Sandhill Cranes grazing in a field.

Sandhill Cranes grazing in a field.

The wildlife refuge does a great job of caring for the migrating birds that overwinter here. Fields are deliberately planted to feed the thousands of birds that pass through the area. In addition to the birds, I saw literal signs of the presence of mountain lions. The signs warned visitors how to behave should they meet one of the elusive big cats. I’ve seen coyotes out there, though not this time. The ground was visibly turned up by the presence of prairie dogs too.

Ducks at sunset.

Ducks at sunset.

We stayed until sunset, hoping to see the huge flocks of geese fly in to roost, but we ended up at the wrong end of the park. The sunset was still beautiful. It’s possible that some have already migrated back north.

/begin spiritwork astrally stuff

Before bed I took a few minutes as I usually do to check in with how things are going on the other side.

I found Shadow-Heru walking around the apartment in a good mood. He was singing a song about waterbirds. I couldn’t understand the words or make out the melody, but he seemed to be having a good time. For someone who seemed asleep all day, apparently he enjoyed the trip. Then he sat at my kitchen counter where he conjured an image of the lunch we’d had. He started making fun of the Thor from the movie. He lifted his glass of iced tea and said, “I like it! Another!” Then he threw the glass on the floor. Iced tea glasses are usually made of plastic. Instead of smashing in a million pieces, it bounced around on my black marble floor, spilling ice, lemon and a straw as it went. He laughed. The mess disappeared as soon as he stopped paying attention to it.

I told him it was time to visit Ra. I usually check in with him once a day, when I can. We went directly to the Sun Room, inside the boat, Ra’s private quarters. SH then started up another round of the waterbird song, but this time he spread his arms and minced gracefully around on his toes in time to the music, pretending to be a heron. Ra was amused, but he sent us home. Obviously, we weren’t going to get anything serious done on that visit.

A blue heron fishes in the canal.

A blue heron fishes in the canal.

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